If your resume isn’t getting past the HR bots, or working hard enough to sell your story, we’ve got tools, coaching and training to help you whip it into shape.

Your resume is the story you tell

There it is, the posting for your perfect job. You shoot off your resume and wait, confident you have everything they're looking for—the skills, the experience, and the professional development. So why does the call never come?

Companies get hundreds of resumes.
Yours needs to stand out and match all the keywords. Book a session with a resume expert, and they'll help you whip it into shape. Then once you get the call, we'll coach you through the interview process.

Resume analyzer

Getting nowhere in your job search? It's likely resume filtering software has said no. How do you get your story past the computer and to the recruiter? Most large companies use parsing technology to scan for keywords. If your story doesn't match, you won't even get out of the gate. Luckily we have the tool to help. We use the same tech as Fortune 500 companies to analyze it and give you tips to land in the yes pile.

What makes a great resume?

Keep in mind what your resume is meant to do and what it can’t do. It serves as a concise summary that showcases your competencies, experiences and accomplishments. With this understanding, let’s walk through some sample resumes.

Mid-Level Professional Resume

Mid-Level

Professional
Resume

A mid-level professional uses a summary that puts accomplishments and experience into perspective at a glance. A resume for someone at the director or manager level (or the equivalent) also is likely to be longer and more detailed in terms of technical skills, than for someone at the C-level, where what matters most is title, company and accomplishments.

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Mid-Level Professional Resume

A mid-level professional uses a summary that puts accomplishments and experience into perspective at a glance. A resume for someone at the director or manager level (or the equivalent) also is likely to be longer and more detailed in terms of technical skills, than for someone at the C-level, where what matters most is title, company and accomplishments.

View example >

Senior Level Professional Resume

Senior-Level

Professional
Resume

At the senior level, a professional summary becomes unnecessary. Their resumes start with their professional experience and highlight the companies they’ve worked for and the title they’ve held.

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Senior Level Professional Resume

At the senior level, a professional summary becomes unnecessary. Their resumes start with their professional experience and highlight the companies they’ve worked for and the title they’ve held.

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Junior Level Professional Resume

Junior-Level

Professional
Resume

Resumes for these junior professionals also eliminate a professional summary because they typically do not have enough relevant experience to warrant it. Their resumes focus instead on their initial job and accomplishments.

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Junior Level Professional Resume

Resumes for these junior professionals also eliminate a professional summary because they typically do not have enough relevant experience to warrant it. Their resumes focus instead on their initial job and accomplishments.

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College Graduate Resume

College
Graduate

Resume

Recent college graduates typically start their resumes with their education and degrees. Work experience and internships are listed separately to differentiate paid from non-paid experiences.

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College Graduate Resume

Recent college graduates typically start their resumes with their education and degrees. Work experience and internships are listed separately to differentiate paid from non-paid experiences.

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